Tragedy in Oxford: A Message from Our Health Ministry Presidents

Our hearts break every time we hear the news report on another school shooting. And this time it is especially devastating because it happened in one of our Michigan communities — to our children.

Many colleagues have connections to the Oxford and Oakland County communities, as well as Oxford High School. We pray for those killed in this senseless act of violence. Four bright lights were extinguished far too soon, and we mourn alongside their families and loved ones. We also pray for those who were wounded, some of whom are still in critical condition, and for their long journeys of healing ahead. Finally, we pray for our community, which is reeling from the shock and horror of yesterday. We lift all affected by this tragedy in our hearts with compassion, sympathy, and abiding love.

During this time of sorrow, I would like to especially thank our colleagues at St. Joe’s Oakland, who responded quickly to this tragedy with courage and professionalism. In a moment of intense community need, St. Joe’s Oakland provided safe, high-quality care, and we are proud and grateful for their heroism. They exemplify our Mission of serving as “a compassionate and transforming healing presence within our communities.”

Please remember that support is available. I encourage you to visit our colleague well-being page, which includes information on how to access individual counseling sessions, upcoming grief seminars, and more. In addition, the National Disaster Distress Helpline (800-985-5990) is offering crisis counseling to those affected by the shooting.

Peace,

Mike Slubowski
Rob Casalou
Gary Allore 
Matthew Biersack, MD
Cindy Elliott
Nancy Graebner
Alonzo Lewis
John O’Malley
Dave Spivey
Shannon Striebich
Kristen Woods, MD

Sign Up for Electronic W-2 by Dec. 31

If you’d like to file your 2021 income tax return as early as possible, sign up for electronic delivery of your Form W-2, which is used to report your wages and taxes paid.

Sign up by 11:59 p.m. ET on Dec. 31, 2021 and you’ll have access to your electronic W-2 in mid-January 2022. If you previously signed up for electronic delivery of your W-2, your election will carry forward. No further action is needed. You’ll receive an alert in your Workday inbox to let you know when the W-2 is available.

If you prefer a paper W-2, it will be mailed from Atlanta on Jan. 31, 2022, so you won’t be able to finalize your 2021 tax return until you receive this document. 

If you’ve yet to sign up for electronic delivery of your W-2, or you want to check your status, simply follow these steps:

  1. Log into Workday.
  2. Click on the Pay icon.
  3. In the View section, click My Tax Documents.
  4. Click Edit in the Printing Election area.
  5. Click OK on the Change Year-End Tax Documents Printing Elections page.
  6. Select the radio button next to Receive electronic copy of my Year-End Tax Documents.*
  7. Click OK.
  8. You’ll receive an alert in your Workday inbox to let you know when the W-2 is available.

*Note: If you transferred from one ministry to another in 2021, you may have two or more lines on this page. If so, you must follow instructions 4 through 7 for each line.

If you have any questions, contact your local payroll department.

Check Your Tax Withholdings Now

This is also a great time of year to review your tax withholdings to ensure you have proper tax amounts withheld in the new year. Too little tax withholding can lead to a tax bill or penalty. Too much tax can mean you will not have use of the money until you receive a tax refund.

If you need to make a tax withholding change, log into Workday and follow the steps in the Change Withholding Elections job aid available on the Workday help site. If you have any income tax concerns or questions, please consult your tax professional.

Deadline Extended: Apply for the Trinity Health Mentoring Program by Dec. 3

Take your career to the next level with the Trinity Health mentoring program! Mentoring can play an important role in colleague development by improving performance, growing leadership skills, enhancing business knowledge and increasing colleague retention. Submit your interest in becoming either a mentor or mentee through Workday by following the steps outlined in the job aid before December. 3, 2021. Read on for more information.

Application Process
Applications for mentors and mentees are welcomed from all Trinity Health colleagues who meet the following criteria (exceptions are made):

Mentors

  • Tenure of at least one year with Trinity Health System Office or a ministry
  • Senior manager or above
  • Must be an exempt-level colleague
  • Performance rating must be at a level of “meets expectations” or above 
  • Must not be on a performance improvement plan
  • Must have a degree (bachelor’s or above)
  • Must obtain manager approval prior to applying

Mentees

  • Tenure of at least 12 months with Trinity Health System Office or a ministry
  • Must be an exempt-level colleague
  • Performance rating must be at a level of “meets expectations” or above
  • Must not be on a performance improvement plan
  • Must have a degree (bachelor’s or above)
  • Must obtain manager approval prior to applying

Submit your interest in becoming either a mentor or mentee in Workday by following the steps outlined in the job aid <link> before December 3, 2021: (scan and attach the form).

Some of the benefits to the mentees and mentors include:

Mentees

  • Broadening their perspective of Trinity Health
  • Taking ownership of their personal and professional development
  • Gaining alternative viewpoints in discussing business challenges

Mentors

  • Connecting with dedicated and engaged colleagues
  • Developing coaching and mentoring skills
  • Gaining an opportunity to “pay it forward”

Time Commitment/Mentor/Mentee Education
We offer mentor/mentee launch and educational sessions, which will be either face-to-face or virtual. Dates and format are shared with program participants. Expected session durations:

Live Launch

  • 2 hour Mentee Orientation
  • 2 hour Mentor Orientation
  • 1 hour Lunch/Reception/Senior Sponsor Address
  • 3.5 hour Partnership Session/Executive Address

Virtual Launch

  • 1.5 hour Mentee Orientation
  • 1.5 hour Mentor Orientation
  • 1 hour Partnership Session/Executive Address

Checkpoint Session

  • 3 hours (Virtual)

Recommended Mentor/Mentee Meetings

  • Monthly 1-3 hours total

Additionally, there will be mid-program checkpoint calls, available electronic resources, and access to both the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and external partner Access One to support mentors and mentees during the process.

We designed the Mentoring Program to:

  • Create a feeling of inclusiveness and foster a collaborative environment
  • Unify work teams and colleagues
  • Demonstrate our Ministry’s commitment to our colleagues’ personal and professional growth

Questions

If you have any questions about the application process or program in general, please read the Frequently Asked Questions or contact Michelle Howard, DEI Specialist, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at Michelle.Howard002@trinity-health.org.

Thank-A-Colleague SJML, SJMAA and SJMC Gift Basket Winners

As part of the Thank-A-Colleague colleague recognition program, winners of the quarterly drawing are presented with gift baskets. If you’d like to recognize someone for being remarkable and kind, send a Note of Gratitude to a colleague via this email address: 

ThankYou@stjoeshealth.org.

*Please refrain from including any patient information within your message.

Thank You notes are shared via the @ St. Joe’s all colleague newsletter, per approval by both the sender and receiver. Both the submitter and the “Thank You” recipients are eligible for quarterly prize drawings. To read several recent heartfelt messages of gratitude, click here.  

The November 2021 Gift Basket and Team Winners are:
Thank-A-Colleague Gift Basket & Team Winners
CHTrish Jansa
LVWilliam Whan
AAKarin Montgomery
AAMichele Jobe
TeamSupply Chain
Individual Recognition since August 2021:
Abby McCleeryJennifer DunnMichelle Davenport
Angela ScrivensJulia KammeraadMichelle Pappas
Bill ShirlenKarla ZarbPaul Arnold
Carla KlineKelly RamseyerRachel Bush
Crystal SchmalzK’Lynne McKinleyRosalie Tocco-Bradley
Erin LeinhardtKristina FoorRuth Raleigh
Eveyln AlbertsonKyle ParkerSavannah Thomas
Grace PeperLisa WarrenStephen Lee
Isabel GaussLoree CollettTed Theodoroff
Jenna KuhnLynda SeeleyTricia Wotring
Jennie BowersonMelissa Hess 
Team Recognition since August 2021:
Nursing AdministrationSpiritual Care Team
Nutrition ServicesSupply Chain
Quality Excellence, Quality Reporting, and Patient Safety and Regulatory teamTalent Acquisition Team
Security and Reception Department

*Non-AA, LV, CH Locations – Submissions to be recognized:

EPICClaudine Kuelske
SMMLKim Spano
SMMLLisa Wildman
SMMLMolly Todd

External Email Will Look Different Dec. 7  

Effective Dec. 7, there will be two changes to how external email from senders outside of our organizations will look in our Outlook email. This information is for awareness. No action is needed at this time. 

  1. The external email tag will look different.  

Email you receive from senders outside of the organization will have the following tag to make it easier for you to identify external email.  

  1. URLs in links may be updated. 
  • Microsoft automatically scan links for security purposes 
  • After the scan, links may be rewritten to show the scan occurred (see example below) 
  • Links deemed safe will include “safelinks” in the beginning part of the URL 
  • Email with links deemed unsafe will not be delivered  

Learn more 

Questions 

Open a ServiceNow self-service ticket for Collaboration Services. 

The More You Know – Preserving Native American Heritage

Week of November 22, 2021
Volume 4


In honor of the Thanksgiving holiday, take a look at a video about storytelling and peace.  Watch Here   O’ Si Yo, Halito (Hah-lih-toh), Hau, and three hundred plus ways to say hello!  November was first proclaimed Native American Heritage Month in the 1990s. We invite you to follow along each week this month as we honor and amplify the voices, art, culture, and history of indigenous people. We hope these 30 days will provide much needed space and opportunity to see past the damaging caricatures and look into the traumatic history as well as celebrate the current lives and contributions of the 574 federally recognized tribes and estimated 2.9 million indigenous people in the United States.   Please note that the links below may not play in Internet Explorer. If you are having difficulties, please open Microsoft Edge and copy and paste the link directly into the browser.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

The Prayers of our Ancestors Representing the West: Idaho, California, Oregon  Tribes: Shoshone, Pomo, Chumash, the Coeur d’Alene, the Kootenai, Nez Perce, Ute, Cheyenne   An Ute Prayer Treat the earth well. It was not given to you by your parents, it was loaned to you by your children. We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children.
   
Traditional Native American Celebrationspowwow is a place to share traditional food, arts and crafts and is a chance for Indigenous people to share their pride in their culture. Each powwow begins with a Grand Entry or procession of dancers serving as the “bringing together of tribes.” Then, a Flag Song to honor the hosting Nation and a song to honor veterans is followed by prayers, the posting of the flags, and a welcome by the elders.    There are two main types of powwows — competitive and traditional. Both types of powwows celebrate the traditions of Indigenous people and most welcome outsiders to come and learn about their culture. Take a look inside a competitive powwow here.    The Stomp Dance is a ceremony that contains both religious and social meaning. To the Muscogee Creeks, Cherokees, and other Southeastern Indians the Stomp Dance is affiliated with the Green Corn Ceremony. The term “Stomp Dance” is an English term, which refers to the “shuffle and stomp” movements of the dance. While it is a traditional ceremony, some societies incorporate Stomp Dance into secular events, such as pow wows or for educational demonstrations. Watch a stomp dance and learn more here
   

The History of Thanksgiving in America
The Wampanoag people helped the first wave of settlers arriving on the shores in 1621, showing them how to plant crops, forage for wild foods and basic survival skills.  After the Pilgrims’ first corn harvest proved successful, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of the Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. Now remembered as American’s “first Thanksgiving,” the festival lasted for three days.    This first harvest was followed by deadly conflicts between colonizers and Native people, including (but definitely not limited to) the Wampanoags. The Europeans repaid their Native allies by seizing Native land and imprisoning, enslaving, and executing Native people.   The first official mention of a “Thanksgiving” celebration occurred in 1637, after the colonists brutally massacred an entire Pequot village, then subsequently celebrated their victory.  The day after the massacre, William Bradford wrote that from that day forth shall be a day of celebration and thanks giving for subduing the Pequots and “For the next 100 years, every Thanksgiving Day ordained by a Governor was in honor of the bloody victory, thanking God that the battle had been won.”   Years later, President Washington first tried to start a holiday of Thanksgiving in 1789, but this has nothing to do with Native Americans and settlers, instead it was intended to be a public day of “thanksgiving and prayer.”  It wasn’t until the writer Sarah Josepha Hale persuaded President Lincoln that the Thanksgiving holiday was needed and could help heal the divided nation that it was made official in 1863.
 
Native American Food & Cuisine Gathering around food creates cultural connection to ceremonies and retaining identity and traditions in many tribes and nations. “Native American foods come from a wide variety of locations” that are heavily influenced by the climate, resources, traditions and history.  Fry bread, made of four simple ingredients, flour, baking powder, salt, and water, is both widely loved but also associated with government internment camps in the mid-1800s.     “The government issued the Navajo Nations rations of flour, salt, and lard, and they cobbled together the recipe for fry bread, which helped them survive.”  Learn more about the history of fry bread and explore 25 Native American Recipes to try at home.     The James Beard Foundation recognized six award winning Native American chefs for their “dedication to protecting native food cultures and sparking conversations and movements around food justice, food sovereignty, and cuisine.”  Sean Sherma, Oglala Lakota  Neftali Duran, Oaxaqueno  Brit Reed, Choctaw  Hillel Echo-Hawk, Pawnee and Athabaskan  Kristina Stanley, Red Cliff Lake Superior Chippewa  Rich Francis, Telit Grich/in and Tuscarora Nations 
   
Be a Change Agent Start a Native American Colleague Resource Group (CRG) in Your Ministry CRGs leverage the unique strengths, views, and experiences of colleagues to impact community outreach efforts, business innovation, and colleague engagement. Participation provides colleagues the opportunity to enhance cultural awareness, develop leadership skills, and network with colleagues across the region at all levels. For more information about CRGs at Trinity Health, please contact Tawnya Morris, diversity, equity, and inclusion consultant, at Tawnya.Morris@trinity-health.org.         © 2021 Trinity Health, All Rights Reserved  

How to Talk with Family and Friends About the COVID-19 Vaccine

As health care professionals, we have a responsibility to be public health leaders in our communities. An important way to fulfill that responsibility is by respectfully sharing accurate and science-based information about the vaccine—especially with those who might be hesitant.

Public discourse around COVID-19 vaccines has become highly charged, with widespread misinformation creating confusion and fear. To make your conversations on vaccines productive, it is helpful to remain empathetic and non-judgmental, and to listen to people’s concerns. You can also guide people to trusted sources, such as the Centers for Disease Control or their primary care physicians.

Below are some answers to commonly asked questions you can share with the people in your life:

Information about the vaccine is changing all the time. Why should I trust it?

As a novel virus, the COVID-19 virus was one we hadn’t encountered before. We’re learning more about it as time goes on, and it would be irresponsible to not update recommendations as new findings come to light. In addition, developments such as the COVID-19 Delta variant can cause recommendations to change, as the situation itself evolves. What has remained consistent since vaccines were first approved for use is that they:

  • Are safe and effective, especially against serious illness, hospitalization, and death
  • Can help prevent long-term complications of COVID-19

Why should I get the vaccine instead of relying on immunity from COVID-19 infection?

While COVID-19 infection provides some antibodies, immunity from COVID-19 vaccines is two to three times higher than natural immunity and can greatly lower your risk of reinfection. The vaccines also provide additional protection against virus variants.

If you have not yet had COVID-19, the vaccine can help prevent you from getting infected or seriously ill in the first place, lowering your risk of long-term complications.

My vaccination status doesn’t impact anyone else. Why is it anyone’s business?

In a pandemic, especially one with a virus as easily transmissible as COVID-19, our vaccine status does impact others. Vaccination does more than protect us from infection or serious illness; it makes us less likely to spread the virus to others. This layer of protection is especially important for those who are immunocompromised or who are unable to be vaccinated.

In addition, being vaccinated against COVID-19 lowers the risk of serious illness and hospitalization. The COVID-19 pandemic has placed enormous stress on health care systems, pushing resources and staffing to new limits. The vaccine lowers the chances we will need to use precious resources.

Getting vaccinated against COVID-19 serves the greater good, allowing us to protect ourselves and those around us, and to help bring an end to the pandemic through broad-scale immunity.

How do we know the vaccines are safe when they were developed so quickly?

The COVID-19 vaccines went through all the same safety studies and protocols as other vaccines. However, due to the urgency of the situation and unprecedented global funding, steps that may have been delayed for years were able to occur in rapid succession or simultaneously, greatly speeding up the process. In addition, COVID-19’s broad spread around the world allowed data on the vaccines’ effectiveness to be gathered quickly, as the protective impact of vaccines was rapidly apparent.

I’m currently expecting, and the vaccines make me nervous. Is it safe to receive the COVID-19 vaccine while pregnant?

Yes, it is safe to receive the COVID-19 vaccine while pregnant. In fact, the American Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) strongly recommends that pregnant people be vaccinated against COVID-19, as the risks of COVID-19 infection while pregnant are so high. Pregnant people who are unvaccinated face much higher rates of serious illness, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19. COVID-19 infection also increases the risk of preterm delivery and stillbirth, making vaccination important for the baby’s health as well.

The COVID-19 vaccines have been shown to be safe while pregnant, with no associated increase in miscarriages or other pregnancy complications. Getting vaccinated while pregnant can also pass antibodies to the baby, providing protection after they are born. For those who are already vaccinated, ACOG recommends a booster vaccine dose once they are eligible to bolster their protection, as immunity from the initial vaccine series can wane over time.

I’m confused by the new recommendations on booster vaccine doses. Why would I need a booster, and should I get the same vaccine as before?

Booster doses can strengthen your immunity to COVID-19, as the vaccine’s effectiveness naturally decreases over time. This is like many other vaccines, which are given in a series to build more robust immunity. Booster doses are recommended for certain populations, which varies based on the vaccine originally received. A quick guide to booster dose eligibility is available here.

The CDC also approved the mixing of booster doses. For instance, if a person originally received the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, they may elect to receive one of the mRNA vaccines (Pfizer or Moderna) for a booster dose, as the mRNA vaccines have generally been more effective against COVID-19. People can also choose to receive the same vaccine for a booster as their original series.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, scientists and medical experts–including those at Trinity Health–have continued to learn more about the COVID-19 virus, acting quickly to respond to new evidence and stop surges throughout the country. Science is a process of learning and making the best decisions we can with the information we have at the time to protect as many lives as possible.

In addition to sharing the information above, please encourage everyone you know to educate themselves about the vaccine’s safety and efficacy by directing them to the COVID-19 vaccine information page on the Trinity Health website, and to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state vaccine information pages.


Celebrate Holidays Safely
We wish you and your loved ones safe, happy holidays. Follow the CDC’s recommendations on safer ways to celebrate them.

Receive up to $1,200 Employee Referral Bonus

Help us recruit top talent! At Saint Joseph Mercy Health System, we are expanding our talented team of highly skilled professionals, and we believe it takes one to know one. For each successful referral you make, you can earn a bonus with our Employee Referral Program. A list of positions that qualify for the bonus is available here.

Follow these three steps!
— Simply contact someone you know who you feel would be a strong addition to our professional staff and tell them about our excellent career opportunities.

— Next, instruct your referral to add your name on their application as the referral source.

— Collect your cash bonus after your referral is hired and has met our guidelines.

Rules and Restrictions
— All SJMHS colleagues, with the exception of HR, Management positions, or colleagues that hold a clinical instructor position with an affiliation, are eligible to refer a Candidate and become eligible for the Employee Referral Bonus.

— Hired referrals must have a valid applicable Michigan license or National Registration/Certification, not currently work for a member organization of Trinity Health and must be full-time or part-time at time of payment of bonus.

— The referring colleague must be employed at SJMHS at the time of the referral bonus disbursement.

— Only one colleague may receive a referral bonus per new hire. The colleague identified as the referral source on the candidate application will be eligible for bonus.

— The Human Resources Department has the authority to make final decisions on any matter concerning program rules, including bonus eligibility issues.

— The Employee Referral Program is subject to change or cancellation at any time without prior notification.

— This program is designed for external hires only and does not apply to internal transfers.

— There is no limit to the number of candidates an employee may refer.

For more information, please contact the Human Resources Department.

Cindy Elliott Officially Named President of IHA

After leading IHA as interim president and CEO for the past several months, Cindy Elliott, RN, FACHE will continue in the role permanently as President of IHA, following unanimous votes from the IHA Governing Board and the Trinity Health Michigan Board. Elliott has been part of the IHA family for the past 22 years and was the clear choice to lead Trinity Health’s largest multi-specialty medical group. She becomes just the third president in IHA’s 27-year history, after Mark LePage, MD, and the late William Fileti. 


“We are truly fortunate to have a leader with Cindy’s skill, vision and values leading our medical group,” said Rob Casalou, President and CEO of Trinity Health Michigan and Southeast Regions. “Cindy is passionate about serving patients as though they are family. She is highly respected across IHA and is known for her caring and compassionate demeanor, her tremendous work ethic and her outstanding results accomplished by working effectively with clinical and administrative teams across IHA, St. Joe’s and Trinity Health.”

Elliott has extensive clinical and operations experience over a distinguished 30-year career. She joined IHA in 1999 as Director of Medical Management and progressed to positions of higher authority. In 2007 she was appointed Chief Operating Officer and in 2016 she became President and COO.

Together with the team at IHA, Cindy has led the organization through several significant phases of growth – from 180 providers in 2009 to more than 1,000 providers and 125 locations across six counties. She established IHA’s 24/7 Service Center, which last year took 3.4 million phone calls from patients.


She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing and Master of Health Administration from Eastern Michigan University. Cindy has completed the Healthcare Executive course with Harvard’s School of Public Health and is a Fellow with the American College of Healthcare Executives. She was an adjunct professor at Eastern Michigan University and has served on several boards, including EMU’s Physician Assistant Program Advisory Board and the United Way of Washtenaw County.

“We are excited for IHA’s continue future success under Cindy’s outstanding leadership,” said Robert Breakey, MD, Chair of the IHA Governing Board.

Preserving Native American Heritage

Volume 2

Erica M. Sun, Community Health & Well-Being Coordinator for Saint Joseph Health System in South Bend, IN shares her Oneida Indian Nation history and heritage. 
Watch Here   O’ Si Yo, Halito (Hah-lih-toh), Hau, and three hundred plus ways to say hello!  November was first proclaimed Native American Heritage Month in the 1990s. We invite you to follow along each week this month as we honor and amplify the voices, art, culture, and history of indigenous people. We hope these 30 days will provide much needed space and opportunity to see past the damaging caricatures and look into the traumatic history as well as celebrate the current lives and contributions of the 574 federally recognized tribes and estimated 2.9 million indigenous people in the United States.   Please note that the links below may not play in Internet Explorer. If you are having difficulties, please open Microsoft Edge and copy and paste the link directly into the browser.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

The Prayers of our Ancestors Representing the Southeast: Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Connecticut, Massachusetts  Tribes: Pennacook, Mohawk, Oneida, Seneca, Erie, Lenni-Lenape, Munsee Lenape, Quinnipiac, Secatogue, Algonquin   The Great Spirit and Mother Earth Big Thunder (Bedagi) – Wabanaki Algonquin  The Great Spirit is in all things, He is in the air we breathe. The Great Spirit is our Father, but the Earth is our Mother. She nourishes us, that which we put into the ground, She returns to us…
   
Native American Culture and Values
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“This effort to protect Mother Earth is all humanity’s responsibility, not just indigenous people. Every human being has ancestors in their lineage that understood their umbilical cord to the Earth, understanding the need to always protect and thank her. Therefore, all humanity has to re-connect to their own Indigenous Roots of their lineage- to heal their connection and responsibility with Mother Earth and become a united voice… All Nations, All Faiths, One Prayer.” ~ Chief Arvol Lookinghorse    The natural world plays a large role in Native American culture and it is seen through their religion, mythology, writings, food medicine, art, and daily life. They value nature above else, as it is a defining aspect of their understanding and way of life. Tribes have unique cultures and ways of life that span throughout history to the present day. READ more about Native American traditions and culture here.     WATCH The Cultural Importance of Native Hair   Anglo American vs. American Indian Cultural Views on Life   Anglo American Native American Success Happiness Ownership Sharing “Number One” Tribe and extended family first, before self Youth Oriented Honor your Elders Learning is found in school Learning is through legends Look to the future Look to traditions Work for retirement Work for purpose Oriented to house, job, etc. Oriented to land A critic is a good analyst Don’t criticize your people “What are you – some kind of animal” Live like the animals; they are your brothers and sisters This is America, speak English Cherish your language Religion is for the individual Religion is the universe   LEARN MORE – American Indian Belief Systems and Traditional Practices

Native Americans vs. Indians Smithsonian Magazine   The word Indian came to be used because Christopher Columbus repeatedly expressed the mistaken belief that he had reached the shores of South Asia. Convinced he was correct, Columbus fostered the use of the term Indios to refer to the peoples of the New World.     In the 1960s many activists in the United States and Canada rejected the phrase American Indian because it was seen as a misnomer and sometimes carried racist connotations. In these countries Native American soon became the preferred term of reference, although many (and perhaps most) indigenous individuals living north of the Rio Grande continued to refer to themselves as Indians. 
   
The Native American Impact on the United States DID YOU KNOW  that the original idea to form the United States government was adopted from Native Americans?  The idea of the federal government, in which certain powers are given to a central government and all other powers are reserved for the states, was borrowed from the system of government used by the Iroquoian League of Nations.   DID YOU KNOW  that many games played and activities today came from Native Americans? Canoeing, snowshoeing, tobogganing, lacrosse, relay races, tug-of-wars, and ball games are just a few of the games early Native Americans played and still enjoy today. Many youth groups such as Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Campfire and YMCA Guides have programs based largely on Native American crafts.  WATCH the Spirit of the Stick  

Native American Influence on the Naming of States Below is a list of states served by Trinity Health.  These state’s names are a direct derivation from Native American influence.     ALABAMA:  From the Alibamu, the name of Muskogean tribe, meaning “those who clear land for agricultural purposes.”  CONNECTICUT:  Meaning “river whose water is driven by tides or winds.”  ILLINOIS:  Meaning “Men,” the name of a confederacy of Algonquian tribes.  IOWA:  The name of a tribe meaning “Sleepy Ones.”  MASSACHUSETTS:  Name of an Algonquian tribe meaning “At or About the Great Hill.”  MICHIGAN:  From the Indian word “Michigamea, meaning “Great Water.”  OHIO:  Iroquois word meaning “Beautiful River.”   

 Be a Change Agent Start a Native American Colleague Resource Group (CRG) in Your Ministry CRGs leverage the unique strengths, views, and experiences of colleagues to impact community outreach efforts, business innovation, and colleague engagement. Participation provides colleagues the opportunity to enhance cultural awareness, develop leadership skills, and network with colleagues across the region at all levels. For more information about CRGs at Trinity Health, please contact Tawnya Morris, diversity, equity, and inclusion consultant, at Tawnya.Morris@trinity-health@org.         © 2021 Trinity Health, All Rights Reserved  

A Member of Trinity Health